March 29th Weekly Accountability Post

This is what Miss 6 did this past week:

We wound up not doing school on Friday. Each day, we spent about 2 hours on these things, and some more time reading, watching educational videos, and playing with purpose.

All About Reading Level 1 Lessons 10 & 11 (review)
Zanner Blosser Handwriting K p. 127-130
Spelling Workout A Lesson 14 “short A”
What Your Kindergartner Needs to Know – Fables
Cookie thank you cards
Singapore Math Essentials of Math K B p. 90-103
What Your Kindergartner Needs to Know “Plants Are All Around Us” and “Plant Parts and 180 Days of Science pages 49-58 – on animal habitats
What Your Kindergartner Needs to Know “What a Ball: Our World,” “Oceans and Continents,” “Maps & the Globe,” “Which Way Are You Going?” and “North, South, east, West”
DK Geography p. 40-47 – finished the book
Kumon Logic p. 62-72, finished the book; Kumon Creativity p. 21-26
Morning starters p. 1-4
Geodes study
Daisy Cybersecurity badges (all 3).

This week, we get a packet from her school. We’ll also be adding in work for the Preschoolers, who want to do “work” too.

Stay well, be healthy.

Working From Home While Homeschooling

When I started homeschooling my oldest, I was a single mom going to grad school. A year in, I left grad school and started my own business. I’ve been running that business (and others) now for 12 years. I know a lot of us have been thrown into homeschooling & facilitating distance learning at the moment. It’s hard to balance it all. I have a confession: the interior of my house looks like it’s a disaster site, and to be honest, I probably won’t be fixing that until this weekend. Balance is hard – even when you’ve been doing it for a while.

Know Your Priorities

If everything is a priority, nothing is a priority. The reason I know that we’ll get to the whole house maintaining thing this weekend is because I have a handful of deadlines. For me, with 3 kids ages six and under, having an immaculate house is a task of Sisyphean proportions. I’d rather let go of that and focus on 1) keeping clients happy and 2) ensuring my kids aren’t spending all of their time with the electronic babysitter.

Use Screens Strategically

That said, I do make use of the television, and I’m not even going to apologize for that. Sometimes, there are conference calls, sometimes I need to follow up with a prospect, and sometimes I have a strict deadline that I absolutely have to meet. In those times, I have no shame in my game – Blippi, Paw Patrol, even that Ryan kid help prevent interruptions.

Develop a Do-Not-Disturb Signal

This one is easier said than done when you have young children. With my oldest, I would put headphones on, and that was his signal to read, draw, or play independently. My six-year-old is starting to get the hang of the headphones on…but I can’t do that if her youngest sibling is awake – I need to have all ears ready. Find something that works for your family – especially if your partner is also working from home.

Have a Plan

I use ClickUp to manage my life. (The link is a referral link, which gives me points. I’m not sure what the points do). Between ClickUp with my tasks list for any given day and my homeschooling planning tools, I feel pretty good going into each day. I know what I need to do and what my students need to do. It also gives me a measure of how I did with a day at the end of the day.

Be Social

Okay, so this one is somewhat hard right now and we really need to think outside of the box. Ordinarily, we have a lot of different activities we participate in for social engagement – and I do a lot of volunteer work. Right now, we’ve dialed back on that. I won’t be coaching T-Ball this summer in all likelihood, and I’ve taken all of my Girl Scouts troop meetings into the virtual realm. I’m considering hosting a virtual dinner party or something of that nature. Working from home gets lonely. So does homeschooling. Even if you don’t think of yourself of all that social a person, humans are social creatures. You don’t realize how many small social interactions you have until they’re just not there.

Things May Not Go As Planned

Despite our best intentions, when working with kids, things might not go as you’d planned. Be prepared for this, and do not let this discourage you. Working at home with kids at home full time and homeschooling them on the fly is a really unique situation. Even those of us who have done this a long time struggle. Something I do that really helps is to record how long things actually take when I’m trying out a new schedule or routine. That way, I’m better able to estimate how long things will take next time and I can plan better. Be flexible. There really is a learning curve to this.

Realize You Cannot Do It All

I know this is related to prioritizing, but it really merits its own discussion. No one can do it all. You will lose your mind and drive yourself into a state of burnout. It’s tempting to try to do it all. I know that temptation well! When I was writing about project management, a wise project manager told me, “You can have scope, budget, or time – pick 2.” That’s a pretty good analogy here. We are all in unique situations right now. It’s okay that it all doesn’t get done. It will. Enlist others to help if you can. If you can’t, it will wait.

Schedule Down Time for Yourself

Finally, I’m a firm believer that if it’s not scheduled, it won’t happen. We all need some downtime. Right now, that’s going to be a bit unique, and that’s okay. It’s okay if you decide, “you know what, I don’t have an immediate deadline, we’re fine on our reading, we’re just going to watch movies and play board games today.” I promise you – from my own experience – it all evens out. Make sure you have time-outs for yourself in your schedule.

Review: Timberdoodle’s Batik Painting Kit

I’ve long-admired batik fabrics for their vivid colors and beautiful designs. Mr. 3 loves to paint. So when there was an opportunity to review the new batik painting kit from Timberdoodle, I was happy to sign up.

About The Kit

There are five options for the kit – Turtle, Seahorse, Fish, Macaw, and Hummingbird. We chose the Turtle. For $19.99, you get the fabric stapled to cardboard with the waxed design on it, paints, a paint brush, and the instructions.

You begin by folding the cardboard up to help contain the paint and you wet the canvas. I think we probably used too much water, because the colors are really muted on the fabric after it’s dried, so be careful when adding the water. Luckily, there is more paint left, so Mr. 3 can see if he can get it more vivid with less water.

Our Review

Mr. 3 definitely had a lot of fun with this project. He loves to paint, and so this was no different for him in that aspect.

The paint was really vivid when he was putting it on – and the turtle looked gorgeous. I feel like we must have done something wrong, because when it dried, it dried so light! I was a bit bummed out about that – but we will try again.

We let the batik dry overnight, and it came out with super muted colors except in the one corner. That corner wasn’t as wet as the rest, so I really think that the problem, like with water color, was that the colors got too saturated.

Tips for using the batik painting kit from Timberdoodle

You’ll want to protect the painting area. You’ll see in the photos that I put newspaper under the area Mr. 3 was working in. I’m glad, because it soaked through the box and helped protect our table from the moisture.

You’ll also want to watch that water to paint ratio. We’ll play around with it some more and see whether our thought that less water will make the colors more vivid works.

Finally, have a plan – my little guy wants me to make a bag out of his batik painting. You can also frame it in an 8″x8″ frame.

Verdict

The Batik Painting Kit from Timberdoodle would make a nice gift for an artistically-inclined child. To add an educational component to it, talking about the history of batik and studying some of the batik fabric would round it out – but not everything needs to be educational. Some things can just be fun! And Mr. 3 was definitely all about the process and having fun with it.

Miss 5 wants a kit now.

Hello Fall Theme Q&A

It’s my favorite time of year again – autumn. There’s always been something magical from mid-September through the end of the year and even into some of January. I’m excited, because even though we’re going to be very busy in the coming months, there are a lot of fun things on our calendar.

I became aware of Roads to Everywhere’s Fall Theme Q&A post from a few years ago, and I thought it would be fun to answer the same questions and share with you some of my favorite things about pumpkin spice season in honor of the Blog Hop hosted by Timberdoodle.

Favorite fall sweet treat?

I’m a big fan of the pumpkin spice latte. What can I say? I’m a bit basic that way.

Red, yellow, or green apples?

Good question. I like Gala apples, but I just picked up a bunch of Granny Smiths so that I can make a pie with Princess Boogie.

Favorite fall sport to play?

I always enjoyed playing flag football as a kid. I haven’t played it in years, though.

Best drink for fall?

Nothing says “fall” like hot mulled apple cider…especially if it’s got a little Kraken mixed in.

Favorite fall activity?

Fall campfires/fire pits are a lot of fun.

Must-have fall purchase?

Fall-colored jeans and a plain white oversized sweater.

Pumpkins: Pick your own or store-bought?

We almost always pick our own. There’s something about the tradition of going to a pumpkin patch. That said, there have been a few “hot mess” years where we’ve picked pumpkins up at stores.

Real or fake pumpkins?

I feel about fake pumpkins like I feel about fake holiday trees. ūüėõ Though, I do have a reusable teal pumpkin since we participate in the Teal Pumpkin Project every year. But, I love roasting pumpkin seeds, and I think we might get a few pumpkins to paint (in addition to a few good carvers) so I can roast them for pie after we’re done with them.

Favorite Halloween costume?

The ones that I throw together randomly 20 minutes before going trick or treating for myself. It’s always fun to get creative and make something random.

College football or NFL?

GO GREEN! GO WHITE! (College football…Michigan State…) though it’s a lot of fun to go to games.

Fall or Halloween decor?

Both? I’m going to be pulling out my Halloween mantle stuff next weekend…I want to collect more fun Halloween stuff though.

Raking leaves? Or no leaves to rake?

Oh…we have a TON of trees around our house, so it’s always a lot of leaves.

Favorite soup?

I have a tradition of making slow cooker white bean pumpkin chili on Halloween & pumpkin cornbread. I love it.

Favorite fall candle scent?

Caramel apple

Love or hate pumpkin spice?

I love it. Pumpkin spice everything, please.

Short booties or tall boots?

I have wide calves, so I have a couple of knee-high boots I really like, but I love booties and boots.

Favorite Halloween candy?

Reeses’ peanut butter cups…and Almond Joys

Pumpkin Spice Latte? Yes or No?

Yes – but it needs to be made right .

Hayride or corn maze?

Both. I love them both.

Favorite fall TV show?

This Is Us.

A good book for fall?

I’m reading Handmaid’s Tale right now. I’ll be reading Red Tents & then The Power. I’ve been on a dystopian novel kick. I don’t really know if it’s a “good book for fall,” but it’s nice to snuggle under a blanket and read.

You are invited to the Inlinkz link party!

Click here to enter
https://fresh.inlinkz.com/js/widget/load.js?id=d1626941e732cbb79b50

Find It Series – Tot Resource Review

I received the Highlights Find It series from Timberdoodle in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.

My kids are 2, 3, and 5 now, so this year, I’ll be adding some totschool preschool activities into our routine. I’ll write more about what I’m using for that soon, but first, I wanted to share this fun series of board books with you.

There are four books in the Highlights “find it” series: Things that Go, Animals, Bedtime, and Farm. Each of the books has three items on the left page to find and an image on the right where toddlers can search for the images. This makes the books a good resource for math concepts, pre-reading, vocabulary-building, and fun.

Pages from Bedtime

Vivid Images Hold Interest

The books have bright images, which engage children. I tested this resource with both my 2 and 3 year old children. They both really loved the books. My 2 year old enjoyed looking at the photos, finding the animals, and matching toys to the animals in the photos.

My three year old wanted to make sure that he was saying the words correctly when we ere looking at the books. His favorite was the Things That Go volume. He’s a big fan of backhoes and excavators and fire trucks, so it wasn’t much of a surprise that he really enjoyed this book.

I was actually surprised by how much my 3 1/2 year old got out of the books. I was thinking of them as solely being resources for my toddler, but it turned out that he really got a lot out of them as well, and that they kept his interest.

Using Find-It Books in Lessons

In addition to reading the books and finding the items, there are some activities you can do with your young student to maximize the value of these resources. Here are some ideas:

  • Match toy animals or vehicles to images
  • Talk about the animal sounds
  • Challenge your student to find a word that rhymes with the item
  • Ask your student to search for other items (i.e. where is the owl?)
  • Ask student to describe an item to you without naming it for you to find it.

What other activities can you think of to use these books for?

Purchase the set of Find It books here, or find it as part of the whole Tiny Tots curriculum at Timberdoodle.

Secular note: Timberdoodle’s curriculum packs are primarily religious-based, but they offer a variety of secular resources – and many critical thinking toys and curriculum options.

What I’m Using to Homeschool My Kindergartener

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. Clicking on a link and making a purchase will result in me receiving a small percentage of the sale at no additional cost to you. 

My 5-year-old is doing kindergarten, and has been since August, since she was 4 when I started, we wrapped up some of the unfinished preschool curriculum. After a long winter break, we’re looking forward to getting back to it. Here’s what we’re using right now (note: we don’t do all subjects all days, and the total time sitting – not counting science experiments, reading books together, art projects, music stuff, etc. is only about an hour and a half. The majority of her days are still spent playing.):

Reading:

We were using¬†The Ordinary Parent’s Guide to Teaching Reading¬†by Jessie Wise and Sara Buffington.¬†However, the curriculum really didn’t suit my gal, and I’d been really curious about what¬†All About Reading¬†had to offer. So, I switched it up. We’re now using level 1, and we love it. It’s hands-on, has reinforcing activities, and most importantly really works well with my gal’s learning style. They just came out with a color version, and it’s gorgeous. I’ll be talking more about that next week.

Penmanship/Writing:

For writing, we’re doing a lot of tracing of words and letters, but we’re also reinforcing proper letter formation using Zaner-Bloser Handwriting Grade K. We do a page or two each day. She loves this.

Spelling: MCP Spelling Workout A

I started with MCP Spelling Workout A before I switched to All About Reading. I’m on the fence about continuing with it or changing to All About Spelling Level 1 once we finish All About Reading Level 1 and begin Level 2 as recommended.

Literature:

For literature, I’m working on making sure she’s familiar with classics and contemporary picture books. We’re using a variety of resources as well as the book, fairy tales, poetry, nursery rhymes, etc. lists from What Your Kindergartener Needs to Know.

Math:

We’re using Singapore Math¬†Essential Math Kindergarten A and B. We’re about halfway through book B, so we’ll be starting the “first grade” book probably in March if we keep moving at the pace she’s setting. She loves math.

Thinking Skills:

I’m using Kumon’s Kindergarten Thinking Skills Workbooks. We’ve almost finished the¬†Logic book.

Science:

Science is kind of a hodge-podge, like literature. It’s partially interest-based, partially driven by what’s in¬†What Your Kindergartener Needs to Know, and partially based on various science kits we have and fun experiment ideas I come across that fit the season/interests. I just got¬†180 Days of Science to add to the mix just to make sure we’re hitting all the standards and building a solid foundation for 1st grade. Science is another favorite subject, so we also read a lot of books on topics and watch YouTube videos.

Social Studies:

We’re reading a variety of picture books about historical events and biographies of great figures. We also read selections from¬†What Your Kindergartener Needs to Know and discuss what we read. For geography, we’re using¬†DK Geography, Kindergarten.¬†We also have a daily calendar we do, and we’re using¬†My Book of Easy Telling Time.¬†We also do a lot of talking about community roles and safety and other things.

Art:

We do a lot of art projects, drawing, coloring, etc. around here. She also has a class she does with her grandparents and loves.

Music:

We’re taking a break from violin at the moment. We listen to a variety of music, and I point out the different styles and talk about instruments and famous musicians.

Misc./Social Activities/P.E.

We’re doing Girl Scouts this year, and a dance class. She wants to do a running group for kids this spring. We also go to the local zoo’s classes as we can.

Resource Review: National Geographic’s Field Guide to Birds

One of my favorite activities to undertake with my kids is heading out into nature and taking a look at what different forms of flora and fauna we see. I’ve been meaning to build a collection of field guides so I can help my kids to identify the different things we see. When I was offered the chance to review¬†National Geographic’s Field Guide to the Birds of North America,¬†I was happy to do so.

This volume is a really great reference to have on hand – both for any nature studies and just for watching outside of your windows. I wish I’d had it on hand months ago when we had a large bird of some sort hanging out on one of our trees (I think it was a hawk). There are greatly detailed illustrations of the different birds, depicting adult birds and their young. Each entry has a map showing where the bird is commonly found – to help with identification – and a little summary of the bird. I’m sure it will come in useful many times in the coming years, and I would argue that good field guides are must-haves for anyone teaching biology and ecology at home.

About Field Guide To The Birds Of North America

‚ÄĘ Paperback:¬†592 pages
‚ÄĘ Publisher:¬†National Geographic; 7 edition (September 12, 2017)

This fully revised and updated edition of the best-selling North American bird field guide is the most up-to-date guide on the market.

Perfect for beginning to advanced birders, it is the only book organized to match the latest American Ornithologists’ Union taxonomy. With more than 2.75 million copies in print, this perennial bestseller is the most frequently updated of all North American bird field guides. Filled with hand-painted illustrations from top nature artists, this latest edition is poised to become an instant must-have for every serious birder in the United States and Canada.

The 7th edition includes 37 new species for a total of 1,023 species. Sixteen new pages allow for 250 fresh illustrations, 80 new maps, and 350 map revisions. With taxonomy updated to recent significant scientific rearrangement, the addition of standardized banding codes, and text completely vetted by birding experts, this new edition will stand at the top of the list of birding field guides for years to come.

Social Media

Please use the hashtag #fieldguidetothebirdsofnorthamerica and tag @tlcbooktours.

Purchase Links

National Geographic | Amazon | Barnes & Noble